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  • Seachem Matrix

    Hi Seachem Support,

    I have 55 gallon tank currently housing softies, LPS & 4 fishes. It is DSB.

    My feeding regime is heavy.

    My latest measurement (16-02-2015) is 80 ppm of No3.

    I am currently dosing Red Sea No3Po4x 6 ml daily and have been doing so for the past 40 days now.

    My filtration is only pile of LRs and am thinking of adding some Seachem Matrix.

    This is where I need your input on.

    My objective is to grow as much aerobic and anaerobic area in the tank to help me combat No3, hence the idea is to introduce more media (i.e. Matrix) into the sump.

    My questions are:
    1. As with any other media, my understanding is that Matrix will also need to be seeded? is this statement accurate? so, I guess what I'm trying to say is I shouldn't be removing my old live rocks in the sump and replacing it completely with Seachem matrix media?

    2. I don't intend to run the Matrix on a reactor nor Canister filter (which I understood to be the most effective way) due to sump size restriction. I intend to just drop Matrix (with or without media bag) in the overflow chamber; this is the highest flow area in my sump. In saying that, please note that this chamber is before protein skimmer. Do you see this method to be effective or not so much?

    I look forward hearing from you.

    My No3 measurement stats can be seen here: http://i.imgur.com/EclNxxN.jpg

    Regards,
    Henry

  • #2
    Re: Seachem Matrix

    Hi Henry,

    Thanks for your questions. 80 ppm of nitrate is high. The fish would definitely benefit from bringing those levels down. Let me start with your questions first:

    1. Correct. Matrix provides a structure for beneficial bacteria to colonize but doesn't contain those colonies in the beginning. If there is space to keep the old bio media and simply add the Matrix, this is better than just swapping them out. To help with getting bacterial colonies started, you can use Stability or Seed to introduce beneficial bacteria.

    2. It is going to work most efficiently if it has water flow through it. If the overflow chamber has the best flow then that would be a good place to put it. In the sumps of some display tanks here in the office, we've placed pond matrix on egg crate between two baffles so all the water has to flow through it.

    Matrix will support anaerobic, denitrifying bacteria; but when nitrate are already so high we still recommend taking additional steps to bring your nitrates down. Water changes are going to be the most effective method. Doing a series of smaller water changes (10-30%) is better than one large water change and less likely to disrupt the biofilter or stress the fish/corals/etc.

    If this is an older tank, detritus and organic waste can accumulate in the liverock, sand, etc. and slowly release nitrates. This can make it frustratingly more difficult to get nitrates under control. To counter this, liverock/biomedia can benefit from rinsing (with clean salt water) to remove loose debris and to help remove waste that can't be washed away (like in the sand bed or deeper in the rocks) you can dose with a sludge removing bacteria blend like Pristine or Remediation.

    Using Purigen can also help bring nitrates under control. While it won't remove existing nitrates, it will absorb organic waste and help keep them from rising so quickly.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Tech Support DG View Post
      Re: Seachem Matrix

      Hi Henry,

      Thanks for your questions. 80 ppm of nitrate is high. The fish would definitely benefit from bringing those levels down. Let me start with your questions first:

      1. Correct. Matrix provides a structure for beneficial bacteria to colonize but doesn't contain those colonies in the beginning. If there is space to keep the old bio media and simply add the Matrix, this is better than just swapping them out. To help with getting bacterial colonies started, you can use Stability or Seed to introduce beneficial bacteria.

      2. It is going to work most efficiently if it has water flow through it. If the overflow chamber has the best flow then that would be a good place to put it. In the sumps of some display tanks here in the office, we've placed pond matrix on egg crate between two baffles so all the water has to flow through it.

      Matrix will support anaerobic, denitrifying bacteria; but when nitrate are already so high we still recommend taking additional steps to bring your nitrates down. Water changes are going to be the most effective method. Doing a series of smaller water changes (10-30%) is better than one large water change and less likely to disrupt the biofilter or stress the fish/corals/etc.

      If this is an older tank, detritus and organic waste can accumulate in the liverock, sand, etc. and slowly release nitrates. This can make it frustratingly more difficult to get nitrates under control. To counter this, liverock/biomedia can benefit from rinsing (with clean salt water) to remove loose debris and to help remove waste that can't be washed away (like in the sand bed or deeper in the rocks) you can dose with a sludge removing bacteria blend like Pristine or Remediation.

      Using Purigen can also help bring nitrates under control. While it won't remove existing nitrates, it will absorb organic waste and help keep them from rising so quickly.

      About your post "In the sumps of some display tanks here in the office, we've placed pond matrix on egg crate between two baffles so all the water has to flow through it."

      Would you kindly share a pic? I want to implement something similar

      Comment

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